Happy Christmas! (Happy Boxing Day Too!)

Happy Christmas!

26th December 2020

This is a bit late for Christmas, but Frohe Weihnachten!,  Feliz Navidad!, Joyeux Noel!, Ukhisimusi Omuhle! So that’s Happy Christmas in German, French, Spanish and Zulu. Why not?

And of course, Fijne kerst! Fijne kerst! Which is Double Dutch, obviously!!

Mind you, I do like the Zulu. Omuhle means happy, apparently. Muhle means ‘He/she is beautiful’, according to Google Translate. So I suppose quite reasonable for omuhle to mean ‘happy’.

So, ‘O, she is beautiful!’, a Zulu man might say of a woman.

Or ‘O, he is beautiful!’, a Zulu woman might say of a man.

And ‘ukhisimusi’ is fascinating. Sounds rather like ‘You kiss I must’. Sort of reminds you to kiss someone, a loved one. Husband, wife, child, friend.

The French is good too. We are used to Noel; you know, ‘The first Noel, the angels say’, from the carol. Or the Cornish Songbook ‘O well, O well, the Angels did say’

But why Noel? Well – yes I suppose ‘well’ might say it all. After all, a new born baby is a ‘well’, as in ‘I’m good’. And Jesus, whose birth is celebrated at Christmas is considered ‘Good’.

Except, when He spoke to the rich man He said ‘Why do you call me good?” Jesus replied. “No one is good except God alone.’

Which is interesting, now I look at it again. And go back to the Greek. Which bothers me as I now realise that Jesus was actually saying ‘No one is good, if I alone am God’.

And this puts a completely different spin on matters.

Still, we still celebrate Jesus’s birth, a ‘noel’, whatever that means. This in fact means ‘Lady’s eternal male angel’. As follows

N = lady

O = eternal

E = male

L = angel

The ‘el’ is angel in Hebrew (male), ‘o’ is eternity as in a ring, and ‘n’ is lady. The last is because ladies have to say ‘no’ quite a bit to children. I will try and explain further elsewhere in due course.

Anyway, the meaning makes sense in Jesus’s case. ‘The Word made flesh’ as John puts it in his gospel, his good news. That is the eternal word of course.

But how about this? Anagram noel and you get ‘leon’. Which means lion. Jesus is the Lion of Judah.

Or ‘nole’, from old English, which means ‘head’. Jesus is considered the head of the true church, his people.

And it seems in Friulian, a NE Italian dialect, means hazelnut or nut. In English we can say ‘Use your nut’ meaning head!!

Again, ‘Lone’, meaning ‘one of a type’. Jesus is considered unique, one of a kind.

Noel is very close to the name Nael, which apparently means ‘brave’ or ‘winner’ according to

https://quranicnames.com/nael/

Or ‘nail’ in Afrikaans or Estonian according to Wiktionary’

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/nael

At Christmas people like to have an evergreen tree, typically a fir. And to dress it up with lights and decorations of all sort to make it beautiful.

There are those who say this has pagan origins and it should not be done. I believe this is based on the following:

Jeremiah 10:2-4

:2 Thus says the LORD:

“Do not learn the way of the Gentiles;

Do not be dismayed at the signs of heaven,

For the Gentiles are dismayed at them.

:3 For the customs of the peoples are futile;

For one cuts a tree from the forest,

The work of the hands of the workman, with the ax.

:4 They decorate it with silver and gold;

They fasten it with nails and hammers

So that it will not topple.

But I agree with the following websites analysis, which I consider very thorough.

The simple summary is this;

God created all good things.

Trees are His.

He loves beauty.

So as long as you don’t bow down and worship the created, the tree plus lights etc, but remember the Creator, then there is no problem. And thank Him and the angels for the beauty of it all.

But don’t forget to share with your neighbour, to love those who may not have what you have.

And you don’t have to spend an arm and a leg doing this, either the tree or the sharing. Or go into debt.

Have we now forgotten Jesus, whose birthday is celebrated by many? I hope not. But people can forget the connection with Easter time, and another celebration.

Such as referred to in Steve Turner’s excellent poem ‘Christmas Is Really For The Children’. Here’s the last verse.

Or they’d do better to

wait for a re-run of

Christmas without asking

too many questions about

what Jesus did when he grew up

or whether there’s any connection.

After all, it is said Jesus hung on a tree, albeit a dead tree. Nailed to a dead tree. Not very Christmassy I know. But Jesus was raised from the dead, and became a Tree of Life, an ever green tree. In truth He always was that from the beginning of time.

And as I have said elsewhere, it was a ‘T’ he died on, ‘T’ for ‘tree’.

If it bothers you that 25th December is not the correct day to celebrate His birthday, I would agree.

But He is considered a King, and as such is surely entitled to have more than one day that people can celebrate.

Anyway, you don’t have to remember one or two days of His birth. Why not ‘Every day’s a holiday with Jesus’? There are always good things to celebrate all year round if you look for them.

So I’ll end with the Zulu again, Ukhisimusi Omuhle! Or ‘You kiss I must, O, he is beautiful!’.

I recommend blowing a kiss to Jesus as a small thank you for coming to earth.

And why not a kiss to those you love, or to those who need it too while you’re at it?