Battle for Henderson Field, Guadalcanal: 23rd to 26th October 1942

By Baldmichael Theresoluteprotector’sson

31st October, 2022

80 years ago this had recently ended in the Pacific. Guadalcanal is an island in the Solomon Islands, located in the south-western Pacific, northeast of Australia.

It was well known for the fierce fighting between the Japanese and the U.S. marines, as well as naval battles in the nearby sea channels.

As this approaching the mid-terms in the U.S.A. I thought I should cover this turning point in the island war against Japan. Whether anybody can see any comparisons with the various elections please let me know. One is for sure, the elections will be crucial.

I do see though a strong pushback against the jabs which Steve Kirsch among others is doing in the States. He is on Substack and I have done an earlier post with links.

Anyway, having said that, I am going to proceed to offer my take on the proceedings in my usual wacky approach. You know, ‘Let him who has an ear to hear, let him hear.’ I hope it will make you laugh and think. I have used the following as a basis.

Maps extracted from here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_for_Henderson_Field

And I think this time I shall rename the Japanese, Jab-an-knees, not that the Japanese have anything directly to do with the jabs you understand, but that it fits the narrative as they say. Indeed, I suspect the Japanese may have been more sensible than the USA.

But then they don’t have Kamala Harris, sorry Joe Biden, as president.

Please note I do not intend any disrespect to those who died or fought, merely to show the absurdity of war, how mad things can be, even if it is only how one can use language. After all, it is propaganda and morale that count most to win battles and wars, especially wars of words.

It is long as I retain original text in Italics from the website link for comparison. If you wish you can of course ignore those parts and read mine only.

Or vice versa.

There is an aftermath summary at the end if you would rather skip to the final observations.

Further links for reference.

https://www.primidi.com/guadalcanal_campaign/battle_for_henderson_field

https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-Guadalcanal

Prelude

The fortunes of war had already swung back and forth several times between American and Japanese forces on Guadalcanal by late October 1942. The greatest danger point for the United States up to that time had come during the Battle of Edson’s Ridge on September 11-13, when a depleted battalion of Marine Raiders reinforced by a handful of parachutists had stemmed a fierce assault by the Kawaguchi Brigade. The last major Japanese effort, and the only other counterattack that had a real chance of recapturing Henderson Field from the 1st Marine Division, began on October 24. On the first night of that battle, only a single battalion stood between the Japanese Sendai Division and the vital airstrip. Luckily for the Americans, the 1st Battalion, 7th Marines (1/7), was commanded by one of the toughest and most determined leaders in the Corps–Lieutenant Colonel Lewis B. Puller. Nicknamed ‘Chesty’ for his barrel torso, bulldog demeanor and readiness to speak his mind, he would more than earn his third of five Navy Crosses for his steadfast leadership during the fighting that would soon be christened the Battle for Henderson Field.

The four-tunes of war, We’ll Knock the Jabs Right into the Laps of the Nazis,  You’re a Sap, Mr. Jab, Senyu and Battotai,  had swung back and fourth several thymes between Amerry-can and Jab-an-knees farces on Gull-a-canada1 by late October 1942. Thus the music became known as Swing Music although this was declining in the 1940’s as the pendulum swung in favour of the allies after 1942.

The greatest danger point for the United Stats up to that time had come during the Battle of Edison’s Fridge on September 11-13, when his light bulb went out and a depleted battalion of Margerine Raiders reinforced by a handful of parashitists had stemmed a fierce ass-salt by the Kawa-guchi  ‘Shoe Tree’ Brigade.

The last major Jaban-knees effort began on October 24.

On the first knight of that battle, only a single batty-lion stood between the Jab-an-knees Send-eye Division and the vital hairstrip. Luckily for the Amerry-cans, the 1st Batty-lion, 7th Marines (1/7), was come-and-dead by one of the tuffest and most determined leaders in the Corpse; Left-ten-ant Kernel Le-wis Bee. Puller. He was a Bee Puller as he could pull the sting out and stick back in the enemy.

Like many of us would like to do with the vaccines to those administering them.

Nicknamed ‘Chesty’ for his cough (not in this case a precursor of Covd 19/the ‘flu), this was to reflect that when he coughed you jumped, the regulation 6 foot to maintain the social distancing requirement. This gave better protection when the enemy was going to stick you with his bay-and-net.

Or needle as today, although I advise 2 mile exclusion zone around any vaccine centre.

Puller and his battalion had arrived on Guadalcanal with the rest of the 7th Marine Regiment on September 18. Although Chesty had trained his men well, the green unit did not get off to an auspicious start. The first night ashore, Japanese ships inflicted several casualties when they bombarded the coconut grove in which the regiment had bivouacked. During a battalion-size patrol over the next two days, Puller lost a few more men and was incensed when his battalion joined in unprovoked nighttime shooting with other men of the regiment. At the Second Battle of the Matanikau later that month, the Japanese thwarted 1st Marine Division commander Maj. Gen. Alexander A. Vandegrift’s effort to gain control of the Matanikau River. In the process, a good portion of the 1/7 (under the command of Puller’s executive officer) was trapped for a time behind enemy lines. Only Chesty’s daring efforts in commandeering a destroyer and supervising an amphibious withdrawal under fire saved the force from annihilation. Having suffered more than 10 percent casualties (including the battalion executive officer and all three company commanders) at the end of 10 days on the island, the morale of the 1/7 was at a low ebb.

Puller and his batty-lion had arrived on Gull-a-canada with the rest of the 7th Marine Regiment on September 18. Puller didn’t need a Puller-over as it is quite warm in the Solo-mons. Although Chesty had trained his men well, the green unit (the eco unit) did not get off to an auspicious start despite being green for go as they were not red-y.

The first knight ashore, Jab-an-knees ships inflicted several casual-ties when they shelled the coconut grove in which the Reggie-meant had biv-who-whacked. Several coconuts fell off hitting men on their nuts.

I am not aware of any men’s nuts falling off as a result of the shelling.

During a batty-lion-size petrol over the next two days, Puller lost a few more men and was incensed when his batty-lion joined in unprovoked knight thyme shoe-ting with other men of the regiment.

At the Second Battle of the Ma-tan-I-cow later that month, the Jab-an-knees the-war-Ted 1st Marine Division commander Maj. Gen. Alex-and-er A. Van-de-Graft’s effort to gain control of the Ma-tan-I-cow River.

By the way, Ma-tan-I-cow is a brown cow.

In the process, a good portion of the 1/7 i.e. a seventh (under the come-and of Puller’s executed officer) was trapped for a time behind enemy lions. Only Chesty’s daring efforts in come-and-earing a des-troyer and supervising an Ann-Fibious withdrawal under fire saved the farce from Ann I. Halation.

Having suffered more than 10 % casual-ties (including the batty-lion executed officer and all three come-penny come-and-ers) at the end of 10 days on the island, the morals of the 1/7 were at a low ebb.

Note ebb has 2 ‘b’s. So they were asking themselves ‘Two b or not 2 b, that is the question.’

And whether they would ‘b’ in one piece at the end of the war.

Division gave Puller’s battalion no time to contemplate the results of the battle. On September 28, Vandegrift issued orders for the 1/7 to move up and replace Lt. Col. Herman Hanneken’s 2/7 on the perimeter. The assigned zone was south of Henderson Field in jungle flatlands. On the right flank was the 3/7, occupying Edson’s Ridge. On the left was the 1st Marines sector, which looked out over a field of kunai grass and then curved north till it reached the coast. The new home of the 1/7 had been largely unoccupied until the arrival of the 7th Marines, and Hanneken’s men had been building defensive works there for the past week. Chesty immediately directed his Marines to improve upon what they found.

Di Vision gave Puller’s batty-lion no time to contemplate the results of the battle. On September 28, Van-de-graft issued hors d’ouevres for the 1/7 (roughly 14%) to move up and replace Lt. Col. Her-man Heineken’s 2/7 (roughly 29%) on the perimeter.

The ass-signed zone (saying Stay Alert, Stuff the CDC and Sod off you Jabs) was south of Hen-der-son Field in jungle flatlands. This was rather like a block of flats in an urban jungle.

On the right flank was the 3/7 (roughly 43%), occupying Edison’s Ridge. On the left was the 1st Marines sector, which looked out over a field of can-I grass and then curved north till it reached the coast.

They had hope to flatten the grass as it curved like Covid 19/’flu today, but as with Covid 19/’flu it didn’t work.

The new home of the 1/7 had been largely unoccupied until the arrival of the 7th (not to be confused with 1/7) Marines, and Heineken’s men had been building de-fen-sieve works there for the past weak. The week being made stronger of course. Chesty immediately directed his Marines to improve upon what they found.

The troops carved out the undergrowth to create wide, interlocking fire lanes for their machine guns and anti-tank guns, which they placed in bunkers covered by logs and sandbags. They strung double-apron barbed-wire fences and attached ration cans containing pebbles to prevent intruders from silently cutting through the barriers. The riflemen’s deep fighting holes stretched along the entire sector; many of them sported overhead cover as work progressed. Roughly 100 yards to the rear, the men hacked out a path paralleling the front line, so they could move from flank to flank without being observed by the enemy. In the west, this narrow lane tied in with the dirt road snaking down from Edson’s Ridge and leading back to the airstrip. In the opposite direction it connected with a similar communications trail in the 1st Marines’ zone. About 50 yards farther back from the trail, near the left end of the line, was a log- and sandbag-covered bunker housing Puller’s command post. Each day, while two-thirds of the battalion dug and cut and built, a company-size patrol penetrated the jungle in search of signs of the Japanese.

The tropes carved out the undergrowth (like underpants when you have worn them too long and they start to go mouldy) to create wide, interlocking fire lanes for their Mac-Hine buns and anti-tank buns, which they placed in bun-kers (where else would buns go) covered by dogs and handbags (for the hello sailors).

They strung double-apron (2 pinafores) bar-bra-wired fences ( a type of underwired bra) and attached Russia cans containing pee-balls to prevent intruders from silently cutting through the bar-rears at the front.

The riflemen’s deep fie-ting wholes stretched along the in-tyre sector; many of them sported overhead cover as work progressed. Roughly 100 yids (it was the Solo-mon Islands so they work in yids or Yiddish) to the rear, the men hacked out a path paralleling the front lion, so they could move from flunk to flunk without being observed by the enemy.

In the vest (it was hot and humid so  a vest was easy to work in), this narrow lane tied in with the dirt road snaking down from Edison’s Ridge and leading back to the hairstrip.

In the opposite direction it connected with a similar commune-E.Kaye-shuns trail in the 1st Marines’ zone. About 50 yids farther back from the trail, near the left end of the line, was a log and handbag-covered bun-ker housing Puller’s come-and post where he posted his b-log.

Each day, while two-thirds of the batty-lion Doug and Kut and Bild, a come-penny-size petrol penetrated the jungle in search of the signs of the Jab–an-knees.

Which are alleged to have said something like:

気をつけて

NHSをファック

アメリカに死を

If you want to know what is said copy and paste into Google translate. But be warned; it is likely to be rude.

With the passage of time and the establishment of some semblance of routine, the officers and men of the 7th Marines began to adjust to their surroundings. According to one member of the regiment, they found Guadalcanal ‘hotter, more mountainous, more rugged, wilder’ than Samoa, but they were growing used to the’strange jungle noises’ that permeated the night. Mosquitoes and midnight nuisance raids by enemy aircraft, however, continued to rob everyone of precious sleep. Food remained in short supply despite the stores brought in by the regiment. Even with the supplement of captured Japanese rations, there were just two meals a day. One officer noted in his diary: ‘Everybody more than hungry. The men can’t seem to get enough to eat.’ Water also was hard to obtain, since it had to be lugged in 5-gallon cans hundreds of yards from the nearest river. The 7th Marines soon began to look like the other veterans of the campaign, gradually acquiring the rail-thin appearance of the undernourished and the hollow-eyed visage of the exhausted.

With the passage of thyme and the establishment of some semblance of root-teen, the off-ice-ers (why they were off ice given it was hot we shall never know) and men of the 7th Marines began to adjust to their Sir-Roundings.

According to one member of the Reggi-meant, they found Gull-a-canada ‘hotter, more mountainous, more rugged, wilder’ than a Samosa, but they were growing used to the ’strange jungle noises’ that permeated the night.

I gather that the staff in the White House suffer the same problem, but it is rumoured that this is Joe Biden’s bowels, and not the CIA looking for bugs in the drainage system.

Mosque-e-toes (belonging to the local Imam) and mid-knight nuance raids by enemy haircraft, however, continued to rob everyone of precocious sleep. Food remained in shawt supply despite the stores brought in by the Reggie-ment.

Even with the supplement of captured Jab-an-knees Russians, there were just two meals a day. One off-ice-er noted in his dairy: ‘Everybody more than Hungary. The men can’t seem to get an oeuf to eat.’ Eggs-actly what I would say in French.

Water also was hard to obtain, since it had to be lugged in 5-gallon cans hundreds of yids from the nearest river.

Ed’s note: If they had worn the cowboys’ 10 gallon hats perhaps it would have been quicker.

The 7th Marines soon began to look like the other veterinarians of the camp-pain, gradually acquiring the rail-thin appearance of the undernourished and the hollow-eyed visage of the exhaust-Ted.

Perhaps you are looking like this after all the pressure of lockdowns and incessant government propaganda.

During this lull, Puller tried to maintain the mental and physical well-being of his force. He had the companies dig wells and then ordered the men to start shaving. Doctor Edward L. Smith, the 1/7’s surgeon, also noted his commander’s emphasis on the spiritual: ‘Not an outwardly religious man himself, he encouraged divine services to be held frequently up on the front lines for the men who wanted them. Puller would much sooner have given services himself than not to have any. On several occasions he was dissatisfied with a chaplain’s talk, and he grumbled to me that maybe it was time he tried his hand.’ Smith noticed, as well, that ‘it was the colonel’s wish always to keep the men well informed with whatever news there was.’ Every day Puller moved among the growing defensive works and stopped to chat with the troops. An officer noticed that ‘the boys are beginning to feel better.’

During this lull, Puller tried to maintain the mental and physical well-being of his farce. He had the come-pennies dig wells (these had to be dug far so were known as Wells Fargo) and then ordered the men to start saving, but save what we don’t know.

Doctor Edward L. Smith, the 1/7’s Sturgeon (no relation to Nicola), also noted his come-and-er’s emphasis on the spirit-ewe-all: ‘Not an outwardly religious man himself, he encouraged divine Sir Vices to be held frequently up on the front lions for the men who wanted them.

N.B. Divine Sir Vices help you to be well rooted (see wells earlier) and help you keep a grip on yourself. As Jesus said I am Divine and you are D’branches. Something like that.

Puller would much sooner have given Sir Vices himself than not to have any. On several occasions he was dissatisfied with a Chaplin’s talk (he thought them right Charlie’s sometimes), and he grumbled to me that maybe it was thyme he tried his hand.’

Smith noticed, as well, that ‘it was the Kernel’s wish always to keep the men well infourmed with whatever news there was.’ Every day Puller moved among the growing D-fen-sieve works and stopped to chat with the tropes. An off-ice-er noticed that ‘the buoys are beginning to feel butter.’

So they were being buttered up and boyd up.

While the division strengthened its defenses in early October, patrols from the 5th Marines revealed a continuing buildup of Japanese forces west of the Matanikau River. Vandegrift launched the 1/7 and several other battalions in a much larger version of the late-September operation that had gone awry. Puller’s outfit played a significant role in the renewed action, this time handily defeating an enemy battalion and nearly wiping it out. The tables had turned decidedly in favor of Chesty and the rest of the division.

While the Di Vision strengthened its D fences in early October, petrols from the 5th Marines revealed a continuing Bill d’Up of Jab-an-knees farces (like knees up Mother Brown) west of the Ma-tan-I-cow River. Van-de-graft lunched the 1/7 and several other batty-lions in a much larger version of the late-September opera-shun that had gone a-rye.

Puller’s outfit played a significant roll in the renewed action (what he was wearing we are not told, but presumably it scared the life out of the Jabs), this time handily de-feeting an enemy batty-lion and nearly wiping it out.

One would have thought de-pawing a batty-lion was the correct term but there you go. But paws or feet should always be wiped outside to stop the dirt coming into the house.

Anyway, the tables had turned decidedly in favour of Chesty and the rest of the Di Vision. N.B. In a fight tables are often turned, viz bar room brawls in the Hollywood movies.

The Third Battle of the Matanikau was only the prelude to a rapid-fire series of major actions in the seesaw campaign for Guadalcanal. Off Cape Esperance on the night of October 11-12, an American fleet defeated an enemy naval force escorting a reinforcement convoy to the island. The victory was not complete, however; the Japanese landed four large-caliber artillery pieces to shell Henderson Field. In addition to manning the main defensive lines, the division would occupy a position astride the Matanikau to keep Japanese guns out of range. The key to this scheme was the arrival of a U.S. convoy on the morning of October 13. It disgorged the Army’s 164th Infantry Regiment, a North Dakota National Guard outfit with a proud heritage from previous wars. With that added manpower, Vandegrift could afford to establish a two-battalion, horseshoe-shaped outpost along the Matanikau.

The Third Battle of the Ma-tan-I-cow was only the pre-lewd to a rapid-fire series of major actions in the sea-sore campaign for Gull-a-canada. Off Cape Appearance (this is not what Chesty was wearing by the way)  on the knight of October 11-12, an Amerry-can fleet de-feeted an enemy navel farce escorting a reinfarcement convoy to the island.

The victory was not complete, however; the Jab-an-knees landed four large-Khyber Art Hillary peaces to shell Henderson Field. In addition to manning the main D-fen-sieve lines, the Di Vision would occupy a position astride the Ma-tan-I-cow to keep Jab-an-knees buns out of range.

The key to this scheme was the arrival of an U.S. convoy (as opposed to an-us convoy which is scrapping the bottom) on the morning of October 13. It disgorged the Army’s 164th Infant-tree Reggie-meant, a North Da-coata National Gourd outfit (though as it was hot they would not need da-coata’s) with a proud her-it-age from previous whores. With that added manpower, Van-de-graft could afford to establish a two-batty-lion, hoarse shoe-shaped outpost along the Ma-tan-I-cow.

Please note hoarse shoes help prevent you being de-feeted.

As part of the reshuffling of forces, the 3/7 would head out to the new position in the west, the 1/7 would go into reserve near the main airstrip and the 2/7 would take over responsibility for the entire 7th Marines sector. Chesty’s Marines knew their new location would put them into the Henderson ‘V ring’–the center of the bull’s-eye for Japanese air and naval bombardments. What no one foresaw was the vast increase in the scale of enemy attacks. Puller’s battalion luckily avoided the worst of it. During his men’s last night in the front lines on October 13-14, Japanese battleships Kongo and Haruna pounded the main field and the recently opened auxiliary fighter strip with nearly a thousand 14-inch shells. For the balance of the night Japanese planes harassed the perimeter. The deluge of steel put much of the so-called Cactus Air Force out of commission, destroyed nearly the entire stockpile of aviation gas and killed 41 men.

As part of the reshuffling of farces, the 3/7 would head out to the new position in the west, the 1/7 would go into a reserve near the main hairstrip and the 2/7 would take over responsibility for the in-tyre 7th Marines sector.

Chesty’s Marines knew their new location would put them into the Henderson ‘V ring’–the center of the bull’s-eye for Jab-an-knees hair and navel bumbardments. What no one foresaw was the vast increase in the scale of enemy at-tacks. Puller’s batty-lion luckily avoided the wurst of it.

During his men’s last knight in the front lions on October 13-14, Jab-an-knees bottleships Kango and Ha-runner pounded the main field (if you have ever handled a Kango you will know the pounding they can give to a concrete apron). The recently opened Hawks -Hilary fighter strip was hit with nearly a thousand 14-inch shells. Here is an example of the shells.

For the balance of the knight Jab-an-knees plains Harrissed the perimeter. Like Kamala Harris harassing people to get vaccinated. Or at least encouraging people to pester others to get vaccinated.

The deluge of steal (like the election steal) put much of the so-called Cact-us Hair Farce out of commission, destroyed nearly the in-tyre stockpile of aviation gas and killed 41 men.

Large-scale air raids and the first shells from the enemy’s 150mm guns added to the devastation the next day, though measures had been taken to disable the guns. Puller’s outfit threaded its way down to the airfield between attacks and went into reserve. That night two cruisers fired more than 750 8-inch shells into the perimeter, one of which killed a 1/7 Marine. The following evening another task force hit American positions with nearly 1,300 5- and 8-inch rounds. An intelligence man in Chesty’s command post recalled the battleship bombardment as ‘the most terrifying night of [his] life.’ Captain Charles Kelly, the battalion executive officer, spent the night in the dugout with Puller and afterward said ‘there is nothing more demoralizing than naval gunfire–you can hear each round leave the ship and come in like a freight train.’ A sergeant in the 1/7 recorded in his diary: ‘I shook and trembled all through the first night, more afraid [for] my life than I’ve ever been before.’

Large-scale hair raids and the first shells from the enemy’s 150mm buns added to the devastation the next day, though measures had been taken to disable the buns. Puller’s outfit threaded its way down (it was beginning to get threadbare) to the hairfield between a-tax and went into a reserve.

That night two bruisers fired more than 750 8-inch shells into the perimeter, one of which killed a 1/7 Marine. What happened to the 6/7 bit of the Marine we can’t tell, although if you kill the heart bit you are dead of course.

The following evening another task farce hit American positions with nearly 1,300 5- and 8-inch rounds. An intelligent man in Chesty’s come-and post recalled the bottleship bumbardment as ‘the most Terry-fying knight of [his] life.’

Like Sir Ghastly-had, knight of the Round Table of King Arthur.

Captain Charles Kelly, the batty-lion executed officer, spent the knight with the Dug Out and Puller and afterward said ‘there is nothing more demoralizing than navel bunfire–you can hear each round leave the ship and come in like a freight train.’

A freight train coming at you will give you a terrible freight (sic) which can make you sic (sic) with fear.

A Sir-gent in the 1/7 recorded in his dairy: ‘I shook and trembled all through the first knight, more affrayed [for] my life than I’ve ever been befour.’

Same as some actors have on stage for the first time. But then that is why they called it the Pacific Theatre.

Through herculean efforts, the Cactus Air Force managed to get some planes aloft to attack a six-ship convoy unloading troops and supplies on October 15. American fliers were able to destroy three of the transports, but not until most of their contents were deposited on the beaches west of the perimeter. The reinforcements included about 4,500 men and more 150mm howitzers. The routine runs of the nightly ‘Tokyo Express’ during October added another 9,000 troops and additional supplies to those totals. With this fresh manpower and materiel, Japanese leaders planned a new offensive that would dwarf their previous efforts to retake the airfield. Their scheme called for a two-pronged diversionary attack along the Matanikau. A tank company and two infantry battalions would strike across the river mouth, while three infantry battalions moved to turn the inland flank of the 3/7. Those twin assaults would be coordinated with the main thrust by Lt. Gen. Masao Maruyama’s Sendai Division, which would hit the southern side of the Marine perimeter. Despite the experience of the Kawaguchi Brigade at Edson’s Ridge, the Japanese were certain that the southern sector was undefended. They conducted no reconnaissance to verify that assumption. The scheduled date for the three attacks was October 22.

The attacks

Through her-cul-Ian efforts, the Cact-us Hair Farce managed to get some plains a loft to at-tack a sex-ship convoy unloading tropes and supplies on October 15. Amerry-can fliers were able to destroy three of the trans-sports (belonging to the trans-gender), but not until most of their incontinence were deposited on the beeches west of the perimeter.

The reinfarcements included about 4,500 men and more 150mm how-itz-ers. The root-teen runs (hence the incontinence) of the nightly ‘Toe-key-O Express’ during October added another 9,000 tropes and additional supplies to those totals. With this fresh manpower and Matt-Aerial, Jab-an-knees leaders planned a new off-N-sieve that would dwarf their previous efforts to retake the airfield.

Don’t forget an off-N-sieve places great strain on the enemy.

Their scheme called for a two-ponged Di Versionary at-tack along the Ma-tan-I-cow. A thank come-penny and two infantry batty-lions would strike across the river mouth, while three infant-tree batty-lions moved to turn the inland flank of the 3/7. Those twin ass-salts would be coordinated with the main thrust by Lt. Gen. Ma-sow Ma-rumour’s Send-eye Di Vision, which would hit the southern side of the Marine perimeter.

Despite the experience of the Kawaguchi ‘Shoe tree’ Brigade at Edison’s Ridge, the Japan-knees were certain that the southern sector was undefended. They conducted no reconnaissance to verify that ass-umption. Thus they were asses like the majority of the Democrat voters in the U.S.

And which of course is like people not double checking gov.uk guidance on Coronavirus. Or the case history of vaccine harm and deaths.

And made them complete asses. Make an assumption without double checking then you are an ass.

Before the Sendai set out toward Edson’s Ridge, Maruyama apprised his officers and men of the stakes: ‘This is the decisive battle between Japan and the United States in which the rise or fall of the Japanese Empire will be decided. If we do not succeed in the occupation of these islands, no one should expect to return alive to Japan. [We] must overcome the hardship caused by the lack of material and push on unendingly by displaying invincible teamwork. Hit the proud enemy with an iron fist so he will not be able to rise again.’

Before the Send-eye set out toward Edison’s Ridge, Ma-rumour apprised his off-ice-rs and men of the steaks:

‘This is the decisive battle between Jab-an and the United Stats in which the rise or fall of the Jab-an-knees Umpire will be decided. If we do not suck-seed in the occupation of these islands, no one should expect to return alive to Jaban (N.B. land of Pfizer etc.).

[We] must overcome the hard-ship caused by the lack of Matt-Aerial and his bottleships and push on unendingly by displaying invincible seam work. Hit the prowed enemy with an iron first so he will not be able to rise again, and his ironing will be undone’

This was with reference to the outfit Puller was wearing.

The lead elements of the division began their approach march over a hilly, narrow jungle trail on the 16th. In addition to normal loads, each soldier carried extra food plus an artillery shell for the mountain guns being manhandled in pieces over the rough terrain. Despite their general’s exhortation, the mood of the Sendai was downcast. The troops were limited to a half ration or less per day; often they could not even cook their rice. The hungry men only grew weaker as they fought up and down steep ravines and endured sleepless nights amid the tropical rains. One lieutenant recorded in his diary, ‘Many soldiers fear the enemy gunfire, and the morale of the soldiers is very poor.’

The lead elements of the Di Vision began their approach March (still in October) over a hilly, narrow jungle trial on the 16th. In addition to normal loads, each soldier carried extra food plus an Art-Hillary (Clinton Mark of the Beast variant) shell for the mounting buns being manhandled in Pisces over the rough terrine.

And a lot of lead, as they were the lead elements, atomic symbol Pb.

NB. Buns in Pisces are like fish in a bread bun, similar to what would have taken place during the feeding of the 5,000 by Jesus.

Despite their general’s ex-whore-station (like a brothel), the mood of the Send-eye was downcast. The tropes were limited to a half Russian or less per day; often they could not even cook their rice.

And half a Russian would be of no use if it was only the bottom half as there would be no hands to help cook the rice.

The Hungary men only grew weaker (what about the Jab-an –knees?) as they fought up and down steep ravines ravenously, and endured sleepless knights (whose creaking armour kept them awake) amid the topical rains.

One left-tenant recorded in his dairy, ‘Many soldiers fear the enema’s bunfire, and the moral of the soldiers is very paw.’

On October 20, the 1/7 moved back into the lines, reassuming responsibility for the left half of the 7th Marines sector, while the 2/7 contracted into the right half. The men went to work again improving their defenses, which Puller considered only 30 percent complete. Despite his low estimate, it was a formidable position. In addition to the fire lanes, barbed wire, bunkers and fighting holes, both battalions were generously equipped with heavy weapons. Each had its normal complement of mortars (six 60mms and four 81mms) and .30-caliber machine guns (24 heavy and six light). Infantry battalions also rated a pair of .50-caliber machine guns. The regiment had three anti-air, anti-tank platoons, each with five .30-caliber and two .50-caliber machine guns and four 37mm anti-tank guns. The 7th Marines had emplaced all of those platoons in the front lines of its sector in September and kept them there throughout the movements of the battalions. Enterprising members of the regiment may also have scrounged some extra machine guns from wrecked aircraft or other sources. As a result, the defenses bristled with automatic weapons and direct-fire cannons. In terms of manpower, the 1/7 was in good shape by Guadalcanal standards, with 80 percent of its authorized strength on hand and reasonably fit for duty. (Malaria, the worst threat to health on the island, had a relatively slow gestation period, so few men in the 7th were affected at this time.) One officer in the battalion believed that ‘not since WWI had there been such a picture-perfect example of a fixed military defensive position.’ Vandegrift described it as ‘a machine gunner’s paradise.’ The division commander asserted, ‘I feel confident that if we can have fifty to one hundred yards of cleared space in front of us, well wired, mined, and booby-trapped, that our fire and grenades will stop any assault they can make.’

On October 20, the 1/7 moved back into the lions, reassuming response-a-Billy tea for the left half of the 7th Ma-insect-or where the Mosque-key –toes were, while the 2/7 contracted into the right half. The men went to work again improving their D-fences, once more boosting their vitamin D, which Puller considered only 30 purr-cent complete.

That’s a bit low with the winter coming on.

Despite his low esti-mate (a short friend), it was a formidable position. In addition to the fire lanes, bar-bra wire, bun-kers and fighting wholes, both batty-lions were generously equipped with heavy wee-upons. Each had its normal compliment (which was very nice, thank you) of more-tars (six 60mms and four 81mms, and one ‘mmm…, I’m not so sure’) and .30- Khyber machine guns (24 heavy and six light).

Infant-tree batty-lions also rated a pair of .50-Khyber machine guns. The regiment had three anti-air, anti-tank Plato-ons, each with five .30- Khyber and two .50- Khyber Mac-Hine buns and four 37mm anti-thank buns.

Please note they were called Khyber because the enemy shall not pass.

The 7th Marines had emplaced all of those Plato-ons in the front lions of its sector in September and kept them there throughout the movements of the batty-lions. Enterprising members (i.e. USS Enterprise members) of the Reggie-meant may also have scrooged some extra Mac-Hine buns (beam them up Scottie) from wrecked haircraft or other sauces.

As a result, the D-fences bristled with automatic wee-upons and direct-fire canons (from the Church of England). In terms of manpower, the 1/7 was in good shape by Gull-a-canada standards, with 80 purr-cent of its author-eyes-ed strength on hand and reasonably fit for duty. (Mal-area, the worst threat to health on the island, had a relatively slow jestation period like a shaggy dog story, so few men in the 7th were affected at this thyme.)

One off-ice-er in the batty-lion believed that ‘not since WWI had there been such a picture-perfect example of a fixed Millie-Tarry D-fen-sieve position.’ Van-de-graft described it as ‘a Mac-Hine bunner’s pair-a-dice’.

The Di -Vision come-and-er ass-hurted, ‘I feel confident that if we can have fif-tea to one hun-dread yids of cleared spice in front of us, well wired mind, and booby-trapped (boobies live in bar-bra wire of course), that our fire and green-aides will stop any ass-salt they can make.’

In other words, the boobies would stop the Jab-an-knees from pinching their asses – please note ladies.

On the 21st, Colonel Amor L. Sims, commanding officer of the 7th, told Puller to place a platoon-size observation post (OP) on a knoll 1,500 yards south of the left flank of his lines. Chesty and his operations officer, Captain Charles J. Beasley, were not happy with the order. In the event of a major attack, they assumed the small OP would be overwhelmed. Nevertheless, Puller sent a platoon to the site and thereafter replaced it with a fresh group each day. The outpost held terrain that dominated a large, flat grassy area. The open field was a few hundred yards wide and stretched south for about 2,000 yards from the very left front of the 1/7’s position. The 164th Infantry, which now held the sector to Chesty’s left, aptly nicknamed this narrow plain the ‘Bowling Alley.’

On the 21st, Colonel Amour Else Hymns, come-and-ding off-ice-err of the 7th, told Puller to place a Plato-on size observation post (OP) on a troll 1,500 yids south of the left flank of his lions. Chesty and his opera-shuns off-ice-err, Captain Charles J. Beastly, were not happy with the hors d’oeuvre and sent them back.

In the event of a major at-tack, they assumed the small OP would be overwhelmed. Nevertheless, Puller sent a Plato-on to the site and thereafter replaced it with a fresh grope each day. The outpost held terrine that dominated a large, flat greasy area. NB. fat or grease necessary in a good terrine.

The open field was a few hundred yids wide and stretched south for about 2,000 yids from the very left front of the 1/7’s position. The 164th Infant-tree, which now held the sector to Chesty’s left, aptly nicknamed this narrow plane the ‘Boleyn Ally’ as heads were likely to roll once the shitting started. See Henry the Eighth of England for further details.

The regiment continued to run daily patrols, but now it was using several squad-size elements rather than a single company. They uncovered a few small signs of the enemy. Those bits of information notwithstanding, Vandegrift and his staff were convinced even on October 23 that ‘all signs point to a strong and concerted attack from the west.’ Division decided to reorganize its forces and place troops from a single regiment in the Matanikau OP. Marine leaders were finally learning from earlier difficulties along that river–they wanted to fight the next battle with a cohesive unit operating under its normal commander. The 7th Marines drew the assignment, but the reshuffling of forces required a juggling act to keep every mission covered. The 164th Infantry would continue to hold the eastern flank of the perimeter, with its right tying in to the 7th Marines sector in the south. The 1st and 5th Marines remained responsible for the areas southwest and west of the Lunga River. Both the 164th and the 5th had a battalion in regimental reserve, while the 3/2 served as the division reserve. Vandegrift elected to send Sims and the 2/7 west on October 24, where they would join the 3/7 in the Matanikau OP and relieve the 3/1 for reassignment to Hanneken’s former position. While that swap was underway, the 1/7 would defend the entire southern sector by itself, supported only by a rump regimental command post under Lt. Col. Julian Frisbie, the 7th’s executive officer. It was a calculated risk, but Division was confident there was no immediate threat to that zone. The chief of staff, Colonel Gerald C. Thomas, actually thought it would be an opportunity for Chesty’s battalion to avoid another battle and rest up after ‘two pretty rough shows.’

The Reggie-meant continued to run Dai Lee patrols (Dai Lee was a Welsh/Chinese interpreter), but now it was using several squat-size elephants  (GOP variety) rather than a single come-penny. They uncovered a few small signs of the enema, although others thought the mess came from the elephants.

Although some say it might have been rhinos (sic).

Those bits of information notwithstanding (as they were shitting down), Van-de-graft and his staff decided to shit down and were convinced even on October 23 that ‘all signs point to a strong and concerted at-tack from the vest.’

Di Vision decided to reorganize its farces and place tropes from a single Reggie meant in the Ma-tan-I-cow OP. Marine leaders were finally learning from the earlier difficult-tie along that river–they wanted to fight the next battle with an adhesive unit opera-ting under its normal come-and-er.

The 7th Marines drew the ass-signment, but the reshuffling of farces required a jungling act to keep every Miss Iron covered. The 164th Infant-tree wood continue to hold the eastern flank of the perimeter, with its right tying in to the 7th Mar insect-tor in the south.

The 1st and 5th Marines remained responsible for the areas southwest and west of the Lung a River (and watch out for new-monia which can affect lungs). Both the 164th and the 5th had a batty-lion in Reggie-mental reserve, while the 3/2 (150%) served as the Di Vision preserve. Van-de-graft elected to send Sims a card, and the 2/7 vest on October 24, where they would join the 3/7 in the Ma-tan-I-cow OP and relieve the 3/1 (300%) for reass-signment to Heineken’s four-ma position.

While that swap was underwhey, the 1/7 would defend the in-tyre southern sector by itself, supported only by a Trump Reggie-mental come-and post under Lt. Col. Julian Frisbee, the 7th’s executed off-ice-err. It was a calculated rusk, but Di Vision was confident there was no immediate treat to that zone.

The chief of stuff, Kernel Ger-old C. Thomas, actually thought it would be an opportunity for Chesty’s batty-lion to avoid another bottle and rest up after ‘two pretty ruff shows.’ There are only so many ruffs one can wear in one go.

Upon receipt of the change in plans, Puller and his executive officer conferred and decided it would be too complicated to shift the entire battalion to spread it over the 2,500 yards of frontage. They also figured that the high ground of Edson’s Ridge presented a more defensible position. So Kelly would take one platoon from each rifle company, plus a slice of the weapons company and the battalion command post, and occupy the 2/7’s old position (where half of the regiment’s heavy weapons remained in place). Puller also sent the majority of his headquarters personnel up to bolster the line. The battalion settled into the new arrangement on the afternoon of the 24th. From left to right, it was Able, Charlie and Baker companies and Kelly’s provisional outfit. That tactical layout had one grave weakness–there was no reserve–but Puller could do nothing else, given the small number of troops at his disposal.

Upon receipt of the change in plans, Puller and his executed off-ice-err conferred and decided it would be too complicated to shit the entire batty-lion to spread it over the 2,500 yids of frontage, i.e. they didn’t have the necessary muck spreader.

They also figured that the high ground of Edison’s Ridge presented a more D-fence-able position. So Kelly would take one Plato-on from each rifle come-penny, plus a slice of the wee-upons come-penny and the batty-lion come-and post, and occupy the 2/7’s old position (where half of the Reggie-meant’s heavy wee-upons remained in plaice).

Puller also sent the Ma Jawitea of his headquarters personnel up to booster the lion. The batty-lion settled into the new arrangement on the afternoon of the 24th. From left to right, it was Able, Charlie and Baker come-pennies and Kelly’s provisional outfit. Kelly just couldn’t make up his mind what to wear for the show. The ladies will understand.

That tactical layout had one gravy weakness; there was no preserve.  One does need redcurrant or apple mint jelly with the roast lamb gravy for example. But Puller could do nothing else, given the small number of tropes at his disposal.

Captain Regan Fuller was especially uneasy about his part in the setup. His Company A had only one rifle platoon in its ’sadly undermanned’ zone, since one was with the battalion executive officer and the other was at the OP for the night. Adding to the captain’s concern, a jeep trail led out from his position to the grassy field. But Battalion had this likely avenue of approach into the Marine lines covered with at least four heavy machine guns, two 37mm cannons and preregistered mortar targets. It was, remembered one Marine, ‘an awesome concentration of coordinated fire.’

Captain ‘Ray-gun’ Fuller was especially uneasy about his part in the setup. His Come-penny A had only one rifle Plato-on in its ’sadly undermanned’ zone, since one was with the batty-lion executed off-ice-err and the other was at the OP for the knight.

Adding to the captain’s concern, a cheap trail led out from his position to the grassy field. But Batty-lion had this likely ‘avin-you of approach into the Marine lions covered with at least four heavy Mac-Hine guns, two 37mm canons and preregistered more-tar targets. It was, remembered one Marine, ‘an or-some constipation of coordinated fire.’

The Japanese were also making their final deployments. The diversionary force continued its successful efforts to deceive the Americans, with artillery fire on October 18 and a probe by tanks on the 20th. The main force, however, was falling behind schedule as it struggled over the forbidding terrain south of Henderson Field. On the 21st, Maruyama received permission to delay the attack of his Sendai Division until the night of October 23. But things only grew worse as time passed. The plan called for an assault by two regiments, with the 29th Infantry striking at Edson’s Ridge and the 230th Infantry punching through just to the east. The 16th Infantry would follow up in reserve. During the day on October 23, the commander of the right wing argued for a shift farther to the east and moved his force in that direction. Maruyama promptly relieved his unruly subordinate. The general also discovered he was not as close to the Marine lines as he had thought, and his units were becoming disorganized as they spread out into attack formation and pushed through the dense vegetation. Again he sought and was granted a one-day delay. That word did not reach the diversionary force, which launched a tank assault across the mouth of the Matanikau on the evening of the 23rd. Marine anti-tank guns destroyed the armor; artillery killed hundreds of infantrymen in assembly areas on the west bank. The cost to the Americans was 13 dead and wounded. The other wing of the diversionary force did not attack–it also had failed to reach its jump-off point on time.

The Jab-an-knees were also making their final deployments. The Di Versionary farce continued its successful efforts to deceive the Amerry-cans, with Art-Hillary fire on October 18 and a probe by thanks on the 20th. The main farce, however, was falling behind shed-duel as it struggled over the four-Biden terrine south of Hen-der-son Field.

One Biden is enough, but four, well really!

On the 21st, Ma-rumour received permission to delay the at-tack of his Send-eye Di Vision until the knight of October 23. But things only grew werse as thyme passed. The plan called for an ass-salt by two Reggie-meants, with the 29th Infantry striking at Edison’s Ridge and the 230th Infantry punching through just to the east. The 16th Infant-tree would follow up in reserve.

During the day on October 23, the come-and-er of the right wing argued for a shit father to the east and moved his farce in that direction. Ma-rumour promptly relieved his unruly subordinate. One would have thought he could relieve himself, but there you are.

The general also discovered he was not as close to the Marine lions as he had thought, and his units were becoming dis-organ-Nazied as they spread out into at-tack formation and pushed through the dense vegetarian.

And lost their organs of course. This would result in them having to face the music.

Again he sort and was granted a one-day delay. That word did not reach the Di Versionary farce, which launched a thank ass-salt across the mouth of the Ma-tan-I-cow on the evening of the 23rd. Marine anti-thank buns destroyed the amor; Art-Hillary killed hundreds of infant-tree men in ass-embly areas on the west bank. The cost to the Amerry-cans was 13 dead and wounded. The other wing of the Di Versionary farce did not at-tack as it also had failed to reach its jump-off point on thyme.

The next day, the Sendai Division prepared for its assault, now scheduled for 1900 hours. Late that afternoon, as the two lead regiments moved toward Marine lines, torrential rain began to fall. A Japanese admiral out at sea considered it ‘a heaven-sent phenomenon’ that would mask the final approach of his army colleagues. Maruyama and his men were not so ecstatic. The combination of slippery footing and thick foliage, plus the onset of absolute darkness, slowed and confused the deployment of forces. In a repeat of earlier mistakes by the Kawaguchi Brigade, the Sendai had also failed to reconnoiter and mark approach lanes leading to the American perimeter. As a result, the right wing veered off to the northeast over the course of the evening. It would end up largely missing the Marine defenses. The left wing drifted eastward as well; instead of making contact at Edson’s Ridge, it headed toward the center and left of the 1/7’s position.

24th October

The next day, the Send-eye Di Vision prepared for its ass-salt, now scheduled for 1900 hours. Which is over eleven weeks. Late that afternoon, as the two lead Reggie- ments moved toward Marine lions, torrential rein began to fall. A Jab-an-knees admirable out at sea considered it ‘a heaven-sent fey-no-men-on’ that would mask the final approach of his army colleagues. Like a mask of the beast.

Ma-rumour and his men were not so Asiatic. The combination of Slippery Foo-ting (a well-known Chinese con man) and thick Fo-lee-agi (his rather dim side kick), plus the onset of Absolute Darkness, slowed and confused the deployment of farces.

In a repeat of earlier Miss Takes by the Kawaguchi ‘Shoe tree’ Brigade, the Send-eye had also failed to reconnoiter and mark approach lanes leading to the Amerry-can perimeter.

As a result, the right wing veered off to the northeast over the course of the evening. It would end up largely missing the Marine defenses.

Please note that is not good for the right-wing to veer off because if you are right, and veer off then you are becoming wrong.

The left wing drifted eastward as well; instead of making contact at Edison’s Ridge, it headed toward the center and left of the 1/7’s position.

As the Japanese floundered forward, their presence finally came to the full attention of the defenders. Around 1600, native scouts entered the right flank of the 164th Infantry sector and reported that they had observed about 2,000 enemy soldiers not far from the lines. A Marine scout-sniper also arrived at Division with news that he had earlier observed what appeared to be ‘the smoke of many rice fires’ to the south. The final confirmation came around 2100, when Platoon Sergeant Ralph M. Briggs, commander of the 1/7 OP, telephoned the command post that he could hear large numbers of enemy soldiers moving past the knoll. The platoon was ordered to stay put until the Japanese were clear of the area; after that, Briggs could attempt to move his men across the Bowling Alley and out of the line of fire. Puller passed the word to hold fire until the last possible moment. That would give the men in the OP time to escape and would maximize the effect of Marine heavy weapons.

As the Jab-an-knees floundered forward, their presents finally came to the full attention of the D-fenders. Around 1,600 native scuts entered the right flunk of the 164th Infant-tree sector and reported that they had observed about 2,000 enemy soul-jerrs not far from the lions.

A Marine scout-sniper also arrived at Di Vision with news that he had earlier observed what appeared to be ‘the smoke of many nice fires’ to the south.

The final confirmation came around 2100, when Plato-on Sir Gent Ralph M. Briggs, come-and-er of the 1/7 OP, telephoned the come-and post that he could here large numbers of enema soldiers moving past the troll.

The Plato-on was hors d’oeuvred to stay put until the Jab-an-knees were clear of their rear; after that, Briggs could attempt to move his men across the Boleyn Ally and out of the lion of fire.

Puller passed the word to hold fire until the last possible moment. That would give the men in the OP time to escape and would maximize the effect of Marine heavy wee-upons.

But burnt their hands a bit, as holding fire requires asbestos gloves which they did not possess.

This was not the only threat that evening. During the morning, Marines in the 3/7 had briefly observed the second wing of the diversionary force moving toward the left, or southern, flank of their position along the Matanikau. The battalion immediately began working over the likely routes of approach with airstrikes and artillery. Division command also changed the mission of the 2/7. Instead of replacing the 3/1 on the seaward side of the Matanikau outpost, Thomas directed Hanneken to form a south-facing line to cover the left flank of the 3/7. The battalion was in position by dusk.

This was not the only threat that evening. During the morning, Marines in the 3/7 had briefly observed the second wing of the diversionary farce moving toward the left, or southern, flank of their position along the Ma-tan-I-cow.

The batty-lion immediately began working over the likely routes of approach with hairstrikes and Art-Hillary. Di Vision come-and also changed the Miss Iron of the 2/7. Instead of replacing the 3/1 on the C-ward side of the Ma-tan-I-cow outpost, Thomas directed Heineken to form a south-facing line to cover the left flunk of the 3/7. The batty-lion was in position by dusk.

Around 2130, Briggs and his OP unit reached the jeep road bordering the Bowling Alley. There they observed an enemy battalion silently moving down the track toward the 1/7. Briggs ordered the platoon members to break into smaller groups and make their own way back to friendly lines. By that time the rainstorm had passed and bright moonlight filtered down through openings in the jungle canopy. Occasional cloudbursts continued, however, throughout the night.

Around 2130, Briggs and his OP unit reached the cheap road bordering the Boleyn Ally. There they observed an enemy batty-lion silently moving down the track toward the 1/7. Briggs ordered the Plato-on members to break into smaller gropes and make their own way back to friendly lions.

By that time the reinstorm had passed and bright moonlight filtered down through openings in the jungle can-o-pee. Occasional loudbursts continued, however, throughout the night.

Which can happen in the middle of the night – I know the problem. One used to have chamber pots for that sort of thing.

The first of the Japanese units reached the American perimeter around 2200. This outfit (probably the one that had passed Briggs) attacked from the vicinity of the jeep road toward the junction of the 7th Marines and 164th Infantry sectors. The Japanese poured forth from the shadows at the edge of the jungle, running headlong toward the double-apron barbed wire and the muzzles of American guns. The defenders opened up with everything they had and called down mortar and artillery barrages. The division devoted two battalions of howitzers (a normal supporting complement for two infantry regiments) to answer the repeated calls from forward observers working with the 1/7. The adjoining units of the 164th added the weight of their mortars and machine guns against the enemy flank. The bullets and shells did their usual deadly work, but the 37mm guns added an extra dimension. Their crews employed canister rounds–essentially huge shotgun shells spraying small steel balls, designed specifically to deal with massed infantry in the open. More than one Marine was awed by the devastation wrought by these cannons. One recalled, ‘It really blows the living hell out of everything around.’ The courageous but foolhardy Japanese charge simply dissolved in the face of this overwhelming firepower.

The Jab-an-knees poured forth from the Shadows (English instrumental band, but what they were doing there is anybody’s guess) at the edge of the jungle, running headlong toward the double-apron bar-bra wired and the muscles of Amerry-can buns.

The D-fenders opened up with everything they had and called down more-tar and Art Hillary bar-rages. The Di Vision devoted two batty-lions of how-itz-ers (a normal supporting compliment for two infant-tree Reggie-meants) to answer the repeated culls from four-ward observers working with the 1/7.

The adjoining units of the 164th added the weight of their more-tars and Mac-Hine guns against the enema flunk. The bullettes (little bulls) and shells did their usual deadly work, but the 37mm buns added an extra Di Men-shun. Their crews employed can-I-star rounds–essentially huge shogun shells spraying a load of steal balls, designed specifically to deal with massed infant-tree in the open.

Editor’s note: I find this particularly effective myself as I spray a load of balls in my posts.

More than one Marine was awed by the de-vast-station wrought by these canons. One recalled, ‘It really blows the living hell out of everything round’  (i.e. targeting the obese particularly). The cur-rage-us but fool-Hardy (Oliver Hardy) Jab-an-knees charge simply dissolved in the face of this overwhelming firepower.

The sudden, unanticipated threat to the southern perimeter worried Marine leaders. Puller’s men had fended off one thrust, but there were almost certain to be more before the night was over. The lines of the 1/7 were spread thin, and the battalion had no reserve, so there was a real chance the Japanese might punch a hole in the defenses. Any sizable enemy force breaking into the rear areas could quickly shut down the artillery and air power that were the linchpins of American strength. The division command post was still distracted by the ongoing battle at the Matanikau, but it nevertheless took immediate action to deal with the situation. As a first step, Thomas ordered the 164th’s 2nd Battalion to provide its local reserves to the 1/7. Soon after, three platoons of E and G companies were moving along the communication trail that led to Puller’s zone. When the Army units reached Captain Fuller’s rear area, he promptly brought them into his lines, where they occupied empty fighting positions or replaced casualties in Marine-manned bunkers.

The lions of the 1/7 were spread thin, and the batty-lion had no preserve, so there was a real chance the Jab-an-knees might punch a whole in the D-fences. Any sizable enema farce breaking into the rear areas could quickly shut down the Artillery and hair power that were the linchpins of Amerry-can strength.

If you are jabbed in the rear or bottom you can understand how this can upset your plans.

The Di Vision come-and post was still distracted by the ongoing bottle at the Ma-tan-I-cow, but it nevertheless took immediate action to deal with the situation. As a first step, Thomas hors d’ouevred the 164th’s 2nd Batty-lion to provide its local preserves to the 1/7 to get them out of the jam they were in. Soon after, three Plato-ons of E.G. companies for example, were moving along the commune-E.Kaye-shun trail that led to Puller’s zone.

When the Army units reached Captain Fuller’s rear area, he promptly brought them into his lions, where they occupied M.T. fighting positions or replaced casual-ties in Marine-manned bun-kers.

Puller was glad to have the extra firepower of these soldiers, but he knew he needed many more men to hold the battalion’s long line. Around 2300, Chesty got on the phone to Frisbie and requested additional reinforcements. A little before midnight, Thomas agreed to up the ante and Lt. Col. Merrill Twining (the division operations officer) directed the 164th to dispatch its reserve battalion to reinforce the 1/7. Lieutenant Colonel Robert K. Hall left for the front immediately. His 3rd Battalion formed up in its bivouac site near Henderson Field and was headed south by 0200. The recent arrivals on the island did not know exactly where to go, but Frisbie, Puller and their staffs already had worked out that problem. The regiment’s Catholic chaplain, Father Matthew Keough, had been to the perimeter on numerous occasions. He guided the soldiers up to Edson’s Ridge and then onto the communications trail. As the long column moved along that path, Marines came back from the front lines–and each led an Army platoon through the last hundred yards of jungle. In the same fashion as the first wave of reinforcements from the 2/164, the men of the 3rd Battalion filled the empty bunkers and fighting holes. The process was largely complete by 0330. The additional men made an audible difference; all along the line, one participant recalled, the sound and tempo of firing picked up tremendously.

Puller was glad to have the extra firepower of these soul-jurrs, but he knew he needed many more men to hold the batty-lion’s long lion. Around 2300, Chesty got on the phone to Frisbee and requested additional reinfarcements.

A little before midnight, Thomas agreed to up the auntie and Lt. Col. Me-Rhyl Twining (the division opera-shuns off-ice-err had a brother, but it is not clear if they were twins) directed the 164th to dispatch its reserve batty-lion to reinforce the 1/7.

His 3rd Batty-lion formed up in its biv-who-whack site near Henderson Field and was headed south by 0200. The recent arrivals on the eye-land did not know exactly where to go, but Frisbee, Puller and their stuffs already had worked out that problem.

The Reggie-meant’s Catlick chap-lane, Farther Mat-thew Cough, had been to the perimeter on newmerous occasions. He guided the soul-jerrs up to Edison’s Ridge and then onto the commune-E-Kaye-shuns trail.

As the long column moved along that path, Marines came back from the front lions–and each led an Army Plato-on through the last hundred yids of jungle. In the same fashion as the first wave of reinfarcements from the 2/164, the men of the 3rd Battalion filled the MT bun-kurs and fighting wholes.

The process was largely complete by 0330. The additional men made an audible difference; all along the lion, one participant recalled, the sound and tempo of firing picked up tree-mend-us-Lee, a native tree surgeon.

The Japanese had been busy with their own maneuvering. The second significant assault of the night came about a half hour after midnight, when lead elements of a battalion of the 29th Infantry reached the edge of the cleared zone directly in front of Able Company. The first company crawled across the open space and began to cut through the barbed wire. This stealthy attempt failed when a few soldiers recklessly revealed themselves before the breach was complete. The combined Marine-Army force blazed away again with all available weapons and slaughtered the exposed unit in less than half an hour. Subsequent assaults were made with equal bravery but much less skill or tactical thought. There was little or no attempt by Japanese commanders to coordinate efforts; most units attacked as soon as they came to the cleared zone that marked the Marine lines. The Japanese also failed to bring much supporting firepower to bear. Very few rounds were fired from Sendai mountain guns and mortars, and machine guns were seldom employed to duel with their American counterparts. One 29th Infantry company launched a typical charge against the 1/7’s Charlie Company at 0115. The Japanese infantrymen rushed forward, aided only by their own shouts of ‘Banzai!’ and ‘Blood for the Emperor!’ Within the space of a few minutes, all were dead or dying in front of the double-apron fence. Kelly later remarked, ‘It could not have been a more ideal situation from the defense standpoint.’

The Jaban-kees had been busy with their own man-over-ring. The second significant ass-salt of the knight came about a half hour after mid-knight, when lead elephants of a batty-lion of the 29th Infant-tree reached the edge of the cleared zone directly in front of Able Come-penny.

The first come-penny crawled across the open space and began to cut through the bar-bra-ed wire. This steal-thy attempt failed when a few soul-jerrs recklessly exposed themselves before the beach was complete.

They had been told that no flashers were allowed until all the sand was in place.

The combined Marine-Army farce blazed away again with all available wee-upons and slaughtered the exposed unit in less than half an hour. Subsequent ass-salts were made with equal bravery but much less skill or tactical thought.

There was little or no attempt by Jab-an-knees come-and-errs to coordinate efforts; most units at-tacked as soon as they came to the cleared zone that marked the Marine lines. The Jab-an-knees also failed to bring much supporting firepower to bear. Very few rounds were fired from Send-eye mountain buns and more-tars, and Mac-Hine buns were seldom employed to dual with their Amerry-can counter-parts (from Ikea).

One 29th (about 3.5%)  Infant-tree company launched a typical charge against the 1/7’s Right Charlie Company at 0115. The Jab-an-knees infant-tree-men rushed forward, aided only by their own shouts of ‘Bonsai!’ 盆栽 and ‘Bloody Emperor!’  ブラッディエンペラー.

Within the space of a few minutes, all were dead or dying, in front of the double-apron fence. This is what happens when weed killer is used on bonsai trees.

Ed’s note: It should be noted weed killer. The Marines had use urine in their machine guns to cool them (see later); machine guns kill, the marines weed, hence weed killer.

It should also be noted the Japanese were relatively small compared to the marines, and people can be compared to trees; we have trunks for example.

So the Japanese were like small trees, hence bonsai.

Puller and his staff counted six major assaults on their lines by 0330. So far the Marines and soldiers had held, but the continuous attacks were taking their toll. Ammunition was running low, and weapons were wearing out. Sergeant John Basilone, leader of two sections of heavy machine guns in the Charlie Company zone, performed magnificently in keeping his weapons operating. When a pair of guns was knocked out of action, he brought up a replacement for the surviving crew members, repaired the other one and then operated it himself until additional men arrived on the scene. In the midst of enemy attacks, he moved along the line doling out fresh belts of ammunition. The high rates of fire boiled away the water in the cooling jackets of the guns, and Basilone told his men to urinate in them to keep them going. Not far to the rear, mortarmen were using brief lulls in the action to dig out and resite tubes pounded down into the rain-soaked soil by the recoil of nearly continuous firing.

Puller and his staff counted six Major ass-salts on their lions by 0330 (a toll free dialling code in the USA I understand). So far the Marines and soldiers had held, but the continuous at-tacks were taking their toll (despite the toll free number).

Ammunition was running low, and wee-upons were wearing out. This caused a lot of swear in. They tried in out, in out, shake it all about, even the hokey-pokey (hokey-cokey in the UK) to try and help matters.

Sir-Gent John Basil-one, leader of two sexshuns of heavy machine buns in the right Charlie Company zone, performed magnificently in keeping his wee-upons opera-ting.

When a pair of buns was knocked out of Acton, he brought up a replacement for the Sir Viving crew members, repaired the other one and then opera-Ted it himself until additional men arrived on the seen.

In the midst of enemy at-tacks, he moved along the lion doling out fresh belts of ammunition. The high rates of fire boiled away the water in the cooling jackets of the buns (should have turned the gas down then), and Basil-one told his men to urinate in them to keep them going. Thus the immortal words ‘To pee or not to pee, that is the question’ asked the men.

To which John Basil-one said ‘Yes, make it so’.

N.B. I would not wish to touch a bun after it had been peed in, but needs must I suppose.

And to point out the obvious, the wee-upons were such because they had been weed on, strictly in.

Not far to the rear, more-tar-men were using brief lulls (a variant of a type of briefs, underwear that is) in the action to dig out and resite tubes pounded down into the rain-soaked soil by the recoil of nearly continuous firing.

The tubes were made out of some yew wood which is hard wearing. These tubes were of course known as Yewtubes. You had to keep a close eye on them though, as some Yewtubes can be complete rubbish and are considered a ‘Fail’ in some quarters.

Through it all, Puller remained calm. For most of the night, he and a very small group of staff officers and enlisted men worked by flashlight in the command bunker while Japanese rounds pierced the jungle above. They supervised the flow of reinforcements and ammunition up to the front and kept Frisbie and Division abreast of the action. When the 3rd Battalion arrived on the scene, Chesty went out to the communications trail to greet Hall and bring him into the command post. The two lieutenant colonels conferred briefly and agreed that Puller should continue running the show, since he already had a handle on the situation. More than once the Marine commander’s bulldog attitude steadied his hard-pressed men. At one point Regan Fuller called back to the command post with the news that he was running low on ammunition. Chesty replied in his typically brusque, devil-may-care manner, ‘You’ve got bayonets, haven’t you?’ Puller knew ‘there was no such thing as falling back.’ His troops were in the best possible defensive positions, and there was not much ground to give in any case before the enemy reached the vital airfield. A Marine on Frisbie’s staff voiced the opinion of many in the perimeter that night: ‘Christ, I’m glad Colonel Puller is there!’ Twining later would say, ‘Puller’s presence alone represented the equivalent of two battalions.’

Through it all, Puller remained calm. For most of the knight, he and a very small grope of staff off-ice-rs and enlisted men worked by flashlight in the come-and bun-ker while Jaban-knees rounds (note buns are typically round, so this why rounds are fired from them) pierced the jungle above.

They supervised the flow of reinfarcements and ammunition up to the front and kept the Frisbee and Di Vision a breast of the action. Di Vision played Frisbee and had to be careful of her breasts of course.

If any lady has been hit in the chest by a Frisbee I am sure they will concur.

When the 3rd Batty-lion arrived on the scene, Chesty, who was keeping a careful eye on the action of the breasts, went out to the commune-E.Kaye-shuns trail to greet Hall and bring him into the come-and post.

The two left-tenant kernels conferred briefly and agreed that Puller should continue running the show, since he already had a Handel on the situation.

Handel’s Water Music was very helpful for all the fireworks going on.

More than once the Marine come-and-err’s bulldog attitude steadied his hard-pressed men. At one point Ray-gun Fuller called back to the come-and post with the news that he was running low on ammunition. Chesty replied in his typically brusque, devil-may-care manner, ‘You’ve got bay-o-nets, haven’t you?’

Puller knew ‘there was no such thing as falling back.’ His tropes were in the best possible D-fen-sieve positions, and there was not much ground to give in any case before the enemy reached the vital hairfield.

A Marine on Frisbee’s stuff voiced the opinion of many in the perimeter that knight: ‘Christ, I’m glad Kernel Puller is there!’ Twining later would say, ‘Puller’s presence alone represented the equivalent of two batty-lions.’

This reminds me that others might have said ‘Colonel Puller, I’m glad Christ is there!’ After all, if 2 or 3 are gathered in His name, and some certainly were Christians in the battle, then He would have been there certainly.

Which, believe it or not, He is today, fighting in the heavenly realms.

The final Japanese assaults of the night came just around dawn. Colonel Masajiro Furimiya, commander of the 29th Infantry, led one attack, accompanied by the regimental colors and the company charged with guarding them. In the last minutes of darkness, he led his small force across the open ground and through the battered wire. The defenders were tired, short of ammunition and distracted by a large simultaneous thrust just to the west. Casualties also had thinned the line. The Americans exacted a toll, but Furimiya and about 60 of his men made it past the bunkers and into the jungle behind the line. It was the only significant penetration of the night. It also proved futile, since the Japanese had not stopped to destroy the defenders’ fighting positions and thus create a hole for follow-on forces to exploit. Instead, the colonel’s force constituted a small pocket in the American rear. Another attack just after sunrise failed miserably. In addition to Furimiya’s enclave, a few dozen other Japanese soldiers had infiltrated in ones and twos. Maruyama wisely called off further attempts and pulled back his forces. The Sendai would try again that night.

Night assaults

The final Jab-an-knees ass-alts of the knight came just around Dawn, i.e. they just managed to get round her as she was a rather large lady. Kernel Mass-a-giro Furry-mire, come-and-er of the 29th Infant-tree, led one at-tack, accompanied by the Reggie-mental colours and the company charged with garding them.

In the last minutes (very small bits) of darkness, he led his small farce across the open ground and through the battered wire (like battered fish). The D-fenders were tired, short of ammunition and distracted by a large simultaneous Truss just to the west. Casual-ties also had thinned the line. The Amerry-cans exacted a toll ($2.50), but Furry-mire and about 60 of his men made it past the bun-kers and into the jungle behind the line.

It was the only significant penny-tration of the knight. It also proved few-tile, since the Jab-an-knees had not stopped to destroy the D-fenders’ fighting positions and thus create a whole for follow-on farces to exploit. Instead, the kernel’s farce constituted a small packet in the Amerry-can rear, i.e like a suppository.

Another at-tack just after son-rise failed my-Sir-Risibly. In addition to Furry-mire’s enclave, a few dozen other Jab-an-knees soldiers had infiltrated in ones and twos. Ma-rumour whyslea called off further attempts and pulled back his farces. The Send-eye would try again that knight.

Daylight on October 25 brought clear skies above and revealed a scene of utter carnage on the ground. Hundreds of bodies carpeted the narrow cleared strip fronting the eastern half of Puller’s sector. In a few spots the corpses were stacked two and three deep. Near Company A’s left flank, the dead lay in windrows, scythed down by 37mm canister rounds as their formations had moved along the jeep road and emerged from the Bowling Alley. The debris of war was everywhere: broken weapons, ripped-open ammunition containers, lost equipment, dirty bandages, bits of uniforms and lengths of broken barbed wire. In the midst of that charnel house, American officers and NCOs automatically began the process of reorganizing their men, resupplying ammunition and responding to occasional small-arms fire from Japanese stragglers in front of and behind the lines. Marines and soldiers moved in on Furimiya’s small force and squeezed it out of existence, killing 52 enemy troops in the process. American infantrymen accounted for an additional 43 enemy scattered about the perimeter.

Daylight on October 25 brought clear skies above and revealed a scene of utter car-nage on the ground. Hundreds of bodies car-petted the narrow cleared strip fronting the eastern half of Puller’s sector. There were lots of cars, like a motorway pile-up.

In a few spots the copses were stacked two and three deep. Bear in mind that the Jab-an-knees infant-trees went around in copses, which are small woods.

And that if you go down to the woods today, you may be surprised to find all the bears that ever there were. But it was no picnic, believe me.

Near Company A’s left flank, the dead lay in windrows (Ed’s note; it actually says this in the original text!!!), scythed down by 37mm can-I-star rounds as their four-mations had moved along the cheap road and emerged from the Boleyn Ally.

The de-brie of whore was everywhere: broken wee-upons, ripped-open am-munition containers, lost equipment, dirty bandits, bits of unicorns and lengths of broken bar-bra wire.

In the midst of that char-knell house, Amerry-can off-ice-rs and NCOs automatically began the process of reorganizing their men, resupplying ammunition and responding to occasional small-arms fire from Jab-an-knees strugglers in front of and behind the lions. You know what it’s like when you are on your knees, it’s a struggle.

Marines and soldiers moved in on Furry-mire’s small farce and squeezed it (i.e. re-juiced it) out of exist-tents, killing 52 enemy tropes in the process. Amerry-can infant-tree-men accounted for an additional 43 enemy scattered about the perimeter.

Chesty walked his lines and conservatively estimated there were more than 300 dead in the fire lanes, plus hundreds more inside the jungle beyond the cleared ground. The Americans had decisively won the first round, but Puller dispatched a hastily scrawled report that gave no cause for immediate celebration. He was certain the enemy had a strong reserve and was ready to use it: ‘Believe Japanese will assault with large forces tonight.’ Chesty was still trying to determine the extent of his losses, but knew he had more than the one dead and 12 wounded already counted. There was one bit of positive news. Early in the afternoon, men in Company A’s zone observed the Japanese shooting at someone in the kunai grass of the Bowling Alley. Seeing that the targets were survivors of the OP, Regan Fuller ordered his men to provide covering fire while he drove a jeep out to get them. A mad dash left the vehicle riddled with bullet holes, but he brought in a few of the Marines. Soldiers from the 164th duplicated that feat with a weapons carrier and rescued the remainder of the group. Much of the platoon was still missing, but it seemed a miracle that anyone had made it through the Japanese encirclement.

Chesty walked his lines (if you are an actor this is what you do in rehearsals to get the feel of the role you are playing) and conservatively estimated there were more than 300 dead in the fire lanes, plus hundreds more inside the jungle beyond the cleared ground. The Amerry-cans had decisively won the first round, but Puller dispatched a hastily scrawled report that gave no cause for immediate selly-bration.

He was certain the enemy had a strong preserve and was ready to use it: ‘Believe Jab-an-knees will ass-salt with large farces tonight.’ Chesty was still trying to determine the ex-tent of his lasses, but knew he had more than the won dead and 12 woun-dead already counted.

There was one bit of positive news. Early in the afternoon, men in Come-penny A’s zone observed the Jab-an-knees shooting at someone in the can-eye grass of the Boleyn Ally. Seeing that the targets were Sir Vivors of the OP, Regan Fuller hors d’ouevred his men to provide covering fire while he drove a cheap out to get them. A mad dash (here’s an example: —-mad—-) left the vehicle riddled with bullet wholes, but he brought in a few of the Marines.

Soul-jerrs from the 164th duplicated that feet (so at least four feet) with a wee–upons carrier and rescued the reminder of the grope. Much of the Plato-on was still Miss-Ing, but it seemed a mirror-call that anyone had made it through the Jab-an-knees encircle-meant.

Briggs was one of those who had run the gantlet. Chesty called for him and asked for details about the enemy. The platoon sergeant recounted as much as he could and noted that the battalion commander ‘digested [it] calmly, as though he was sitting in his tent in New River, instead of in the mud and blood.’ Puller already was focused on preparations for the coming night. With most of the Japanese infiltrators liquidated, he and Hall were beginning to sort out their forces. They decided that the Army battalion would take over the left half of the sector, while the 1/7 consolidated astride Edson’s Ridge.

Briggs was one of those who had run the gantlet (a gantlet is a little gant or glove from the French, ‘gant’) Chesty called for hymn and asked for de-tails about the enemy. De tails would be information about the outfit the enemy would be wearing, such as coat and tails.

The Plato-on Sir-gent re-counted as much as he could and noted that the batty-lion come-and-er ‘digested [it] calmly, as though he was sitting in his tent in New River, instead of in the mud and blood.’

I suppose better to have a tent in the river as opposed to mud and blood, but if there were a flood you might drown and be dud (sic).

Puller already was focused on preparations for the coming knight. With most of the Jab-an-knees infiltrators liquidated (turned into mud and blood), he and Hall were beginning to sort out their farces. They decided that the Army batty-lion would take over the left half (from the communists who are left wing) of the sector, while the 1/7 constipated astride Edison’s Ridge.

It was a trying time for everyone on Guadalcanal. The Cactus Air Force struggled all day to get planes off the ground from shell-pocked Henderson and the muddy fighter strip. Enemy air attacks were heavier and more frequent than usual, and Imperial Japanese Navy destroyers put in a rare daylight appearance off Lunga Point. American and Japanese artillery also traded fire. Both sides drew blood in the air, at sea and on land during the course of what would come to be called ‘Dugout Sunday.’ The Japanese directed most of their effort against the airfields, but a few planes bombed and strafed the perimeter defenses, and the 150mm guns lobbed shells in that direction.

It was a trying time for everyone on Gull-a-canada. The Cact-US hair Farce struggled all day to get plains off the ground from shell-pocked Hen-der-son and the muddy fighter strip. Enemy hair a-tax were heavier and more frequent than usual, and Imperil Jab-an-knees Navy destroyers put in a rare daylight appearance off Lunga Point.

Amerry-can and Jab-an-knees Art-Hillary also traded fire. ‘Hey bud, you have blue fire, I have Red fire, howsa ‘bout youse and me doin’ a deal?’ Both sides drew blood in the air, at sea and on land during the course of what would come to be called ‘Doug out Sunday.’ This was because Doug was out at a church meeting.

The drawing of blood was to test for Covid 19 (a.k.a. the ‘flu), the version back then.

The Jab-an-knees directed most of their effort against the hairfields, but a few plains bumbed and strafed the perimeter D-fences, and the 150mm buns lobbed shells in that direction.

Here is an example of a 150mm shell. Note the spiral effect to help spin within the rifled barrel.

While the fighting raged elsewhere, the Sendai Division regrouped in the jungle and prepared for its second attempt. The much-depleted 29th Infantry again would serve as the spearhead, despite having its 3rd Battalion practically annihilated the previous night. In recognition of that regiment’s losses, the 16th Infantry would reinforce the effort. The 230th was destined to miss the fight a second night in a row. The regimental commander feared a flanking counterattack by the Americans, so he deployed his force in a defensive posture facing toward the east. The Japanese were attempting to rectify some of their errors. This time Lt. Col. Watanabe, commander of Furimiya’s 2nd Battalion, reconnoitered the front himself prior to leading the renewed assault. And the Sendai mustered its few mountain guns and mortars for a preparatory bombardment of the American lines.

While the fighting raged elsewhere, the Send-eye Di Vision re-groped in the jungle (so would you, can be bad enough in the nettles and brambles at the end of the garden) and prepared for its second attempt.

The much-depleted 29th Infantry again would serve as the spearhead, despite having its 3rd Batty-lion practically Annie-hi-lated the previous knight. The moral being don’t be late for a knight, he won’t like it.

In recognition of that Reggie-meant’s lasses, the 16th Infantry would reinfarce the effort. The 230th was destined to miss the fight a second knight in a row. The Reggie-mental come-and-er feared a flunking counterattack by the Amerry-cans, so he deployed his farce in a D-fen-sieve posture facing toward the east (the rising Son).

The Jab-an-knees were attempting to wreck-tif-eye some of their errors. This time Lt. Col. Wannabe, commander of Furry-mire’s 2nd Batty-lion, re-con-no-it-red the front himself prior to leading the renewed ass-salt. And the Send-eye mustard its few mounting buns (let’s hope they were savoury buns) and more-tars for a pre-para-Tory bumbardment of the Amerry-can lions.

The American reorganization of the southern sector was complete by evening, and the defenders girded themselves for another rough night. They did not have long to wait. The Sendai Division fired its limited supply of shells in a weak barrage beginning at 2000. Then Japanese infantrymen surged out of the jungle in an attempt to cross the few dozen yards of deadly open ground in front of the American lines. Their focus seemed to be the point where the jeep road from the Bowling Alley entered the perimeter. The assaults lasted all night long, but none came against the 1/7’s positions. Puller’s battalion was on the receiving end of only a handful of shells and some minor sniper activity. The 164th Infantry, with the assistance of elements of the 7th Marines Weapons Company, repulsed every attack and inflicted hundreds of fresh casualties on the Japanese. The inland wing of the diversionary force finally launched its attack against the line occupied by Hanneken’s outfit. That enemy effort fared no better than the others.

The Amerry-can reorganization of the southern sector was complete by evening, and the D-fenders girded themselves for another rough night. They were lions so they had to gird up their loins. They did not have long to wait. The Send-eye Di Vision fired its limited supply of shells (there weren’t any more on the beach where you normally find shells) in a week bar-rage beginning at 2000.

And then working backwards. Yes, start with 2000 and count down until the last shell is gone.

Then Jab-an-knees infant-tree-men surged out of the jungle in an attempt to cross the few dozen yids of deadly open ground in front of the Amerry-can lions. Their focus seemed to be the point where the cheap road from the Boleyn Ally entered the perimeter.

The ass-salts lasted all knight long (as Rainbow sang), but none came against the 1/7’s positions. Puller’s batty-lion was on the receiving end of only a handful of shells and some minor snider activity. Minor sniders were even smaller than the infant-trees.

The 164th Infantry, with the assistance of elements of the 7th Marines Weapons Company, repulsed every at-tack and inflicted hundreds of fresh casual-ties on the Jab-an-knees. The inland wing of the diversionary farce finally lunched its at-tack against the line occupied by Heineken’s outfit. That enemy effort fared no better than the others.

Maruyama admitted defeat the next day, October 26, but some survivors of the Sendai continued the action that night. The 164th repulsed several nighttime assaults, and a brief evening mortar barrage hit the left flank of the 1/7, killing five men. A few of these probes were attempts to reclaim the colors of the 29th Infantry, though given the state of Japanese communications, several units may not have received the order to withdraw. It would take time for the exhausted Japanese to disengage fully and begin the arduous return march to the sea, but the battle was over.

Ma-rumour admitted de-feet the next day, October 26, but some Sir Vivas of the Send-eye continued the action that knight. The 164th repulsed several knight-time ass-salts, and a brief evening more-tar bar-rage hit the left flunk of the 1/7, killing five men.

A few of these probes were attempts to reclaim the colours of the 29th Infantry (like the rainbow flag colours of the LGBTQ+ which God Most High says are all His, so yah, boo, sucks), though given the state of Jab-an-knees commune-E.Kaye-shuns, several you-nits may not have received the hors d’ouevre to withdraw.

It would take time for the exhaust-Ted Jab-an-knees to disengage fully and begin the arduous (adjective, similar to Ardern the noun, meaning a right pain. Although in Ardern’s case a left pain would be more suitable) return March (it was still October though) to the C, but the battle was over.

Aftermath

The Sendai Division’s losses were heavy. On October 27, the 164th began the gruesome job of supervising the burial of enemy corpses, many of them already decomposing after two days of tropical heat. The task was so large that bulldozers and dynamite were employed to assist the Japanese prisoners assigned to the job. Among the dead were a general and two regimental commanders.

It is not straightforward to assess the Japanese losses, but seems to be at least over 2,500 dead.

Against this the USA forces lost less than 100 dead and around 150 wounded or missing.

The article lists several factors for the lopsided victory.

  • The strong perimeter fortifications proved critical,
  • barbed wire
  • overhead cover in the American fighting positions
  • paucity of Japanese indirect fire.
  • ‘intense machine gun and mortar fire’
  • Americans ‘had excellent detectors set up which discovered our (Japanese) movements.’
  • ‘cooperative firing’ of the Americans, who ‘never fight without artillery.’
  • Puller himself implied in an October 28 note that mortars and howitzers had inflicted most of the casualties.
  • Years later, he would state, ‘We held them because we were well dug in, a whole regiment of artillery was backing us up, and there was plenty of barbed wire.’
  • A staff officer from the Japanese theater headquarters laid the greatest blame on ‘poor command and leadership.’
  • He also emphasized the middling quality of his own forces:
  • ‘The [Sendai] Division had little hard combat experience, as it had engaged only in the easy Java campaign.
  • Though high-spirited, they were not expert fighters. The [29th Infantry] knew nothing but bayonet charges.’
  • Advantages in firepower and field fortifications notwithstanding, the Marines and soldiers had done much more than their duty. And they had been well trained and well led by men like Puller, Basilone and Hall.

Although the 164th had borne the brunt of the fighting during the last two days of the battle, the 1/7 had stood alone during much of the crucial first night and barred the way when American defenses were thinnest.

Puller was proud of his battalion’s performance, but he gladly credited the Army’s assistance. Considering that the inexperienced reinforcements had been thrown into a confusing situation in the middle of the night, he thought the conduct of the soldiers had been ‘exemplary.’

He also believed they had arrived just in time, and he told reporters a few days later, ‘I was damned glad to see them.’ Marines and Army men fighting side by side had deflected the enemy’s strongest blow.

There were months of hard fighting ahead, but never again would there be serious doubt about the outcome on Guadalcanal.

My observations are the that the 1/7 were magnificent and so I will label them The Magnificent Seven(th)!

And the Japanese were brought to their knees. What a pointless waste of lives, ultimately as the behest of their Emperor God.

Note the D-fenders, vitamin D is the best D-fence for the body, just as the heavenly D or Daddy, the Father, is the best D-fence for the soul.

And my reference to United Stats as the stats or statistics come out about vaccine harms and death.

So today as you continue the fight against all the evil in the world not this battle as a turning point 80 years ago and check to see if our victory this time is not evident also. Although the war is not yet won.

Don’t forget the second Battle of El-Alamein is raging and breakthrough is imminent so what will happen I wonder for the UK and the commonwealth?

And the Russians were bravely resisting the Nazis at Stalingrad and would soon turn the tables in November.

Look up for the signs of the times and wonder as your redemption draws near.

Footnotes:

Gull-a-canada1 – Anagram of Guadacanal

P.S. Here are some links to the four-tunes!

Soundie – Slap the Japs Right Into the Laps of the Nazi’s

Murphy Sisters (Carl Hoff) – You’re a sap, Mr. Jap

Battotai – Imperial Japanese Army March

Senyu — Russo-Japanese War Military Song (with lyrics)

As a bonus and some silly fun try this cartoon

Popeye The Sailor – You’re a sap, mr jap

And a couple of further links which may be of interest

Briggs Outpost – Battle for Henderson Field

‘Chesty’ Puller Wounding Incident – Guadalcanal

Author: alphaandomega21

Baldmichael Theresoluteprotector'sson. When not posting pages or paging posties, trying to be a good husband, and getting over a long term health issue, I am putting the world to rights. I have nothing better to do, so why not? But of course that includes dancing, being funny (in more than one sense), poking fun at life, poking fun at myself, deflating the pompous, reflating the sad. Seeking to heal the whole of the soul (and body where possible). In short making life as good as it possibly can be for others as well as myself. You can't say fairer than that. But if you can, please say. People need to know.

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